SEARCH FOR: BOLADE BANJO

Off Me! “The Wake” Pt. 2 – [Slauson Malone] ft. [Pink Siifu]

There’s something intangible that happens when a musician’s and music video director’s minds are on the same wavelength—something just sort of clicks at the right moment that resonates with a viewer and elevates the music to a different plane. The visual accompaniment for “Off Me! ‘The Wake’ Pt. 2’ offers a shining example of that harmony as hip-hop producer Slauson Malone and director Bolade Banjo execute a vision so aligned with the music that its difficult to separate the two mediums from one another. The track off Malone’s sonically disruptive album ‘A Quiet Farewell, Twenty Sixteen to Twenty Eighteen’ offers up an ode to moments of transience. A melancholic guitar greets a listener before booming kicks and stabbing horns pull the curtain back to unveil a dizzying array of sounds that mimics the motion of a crashing tide. This motif of movement holds constant all throughout Malone’s record and Banjo, who also created the album’s cover art, meditates on this concept for the music video. A member of the London-based art collective Gully Type, Banjo weaves together vignettes that depict phases of a relationship from the initial fall to the inevitable break. These short, non-linear compositions match Malone’s frenzied, jazz-influenced …

A Quiet Farewell, 2016–2018 – [Slauson Malone]

Starting things off with a vocal sample that proclaims, “the world is coming to an end,” Slauson Malone’s unbelievable new project, A Quiet Farewell, 2016-2018, is a beautiful deconstruction of sound, chaos, and life, all fit under the reach of 20 songs. Quite frankly, after listening to this project twice so far, I’m not even entirely sure that I have any of the right words to describe the glorious splashes of color that characterize this such profound eccentricity. What I can say, however, is that Slauson Malone’s sound and style are completely out of orbit with anything else I’ve heard this year, and I mean that in the best way possible. Speaking to this point, with features from Caleb Giles, Maxo, Medhane, Pink Siifu, and several others, Malone’s marriage between obscure sampling, soulful features, and a cluttered creative direction is one that communicates an ingrained sense of soul, both in the music itself and in its structural integrity. He’s an artist’s artist, and one that refuses to be anything but himself — a trait that, upon listening to A Quiet Farewell, 2016-2018, I can firmly say is one of Malone’s best. This project is an absolute gem, so be sure to give it …