SEARCH FOR: YAYA

Satisfaction-[FL3A]&[SosaGeek]

Newark, New Jersey’s FL3A is quickly becoming my favorite artists in an area loaded with them but every time he drops something new I am thoroughly impressed first and foremost by his unique, almost rabid delivery that wavers interchangeably between being playful and partly sarcastic to cold and matter-of-fact at the drop of a hat, taking you on a whirlwind of women, war, and fashion in only a few bars. His beat selection is also impermeable, continually selecting compelling and unique instrumentals that seamlessly blend the dance-y melodic elements of Jersey Club with the ubiquitous NYC-sample-drill drum patterns. FL3A is joined by Brooklyn mainstay Sosa Geek who is the latest NYC artist to join FL3A on a track after teaming up with Queens’s Big YAYA a few months ago. SosaGeek matches both the sportiveness and menacing manner that FL3A approaches his music with making the guest-verse fit seamlessly revealing the obvious chemistry between the two. I really hope that we get another FL3A track soon before the summer ends and want to hear a full length project from him before the close of 2022.

Seven – [Drelli]

According to legend, the Chinese Zodiac calendar was created around 4000 B.c. by Ta Nao, an esteemed minister of Emperor Huang Ti. 6000 years later, I am hereby proposing that we forget this year as the Year of the Tiger – because all signs point to 2022 being the year of the Drelli. At this point, Drelli is far from being a ‘deep cut’ – we’ve seen the Minneapolis rapper featured on the LL pages for years, so what makes his newest single “Seven” any different from “Fancy” with Khary or “Yayaya” with AJRadico? Nothing, it’s another fucking banger from one of hip-hop’s most consistent burgeoning acts, and consistency is a skill many talk about but few possess. If you haven’t listened to “Seven” yet, then allow me to paint you a word picture. Drelli’s rapping is laid-back yet instilled with his signature electric energy that could turn him reading the phone book into a strong SOTY contender for me. The mix is bouncy and 808-laden, colonized equally by delicate string plucks and glitchy instrumentation that easily make “Seven” an instant add to your weekly rotation. If you’re a fan of artists like Mike Dimes, Al-Doms, or JID, Drelli is …

Hercules / Paradise – [Shawny Binladen] [DotComNirvan]

There’s no shortage of statistically giant NYC artists right now as many of which bask in their mainstream moments, fully taking the drill sound in the mainstream and replacing much of the grit that made the sound so compelling to New Yorkers with a Top-40 luster that amounts to millions of plays. However the city’s underground was left itching not only for more but also something new. Shawny Binladen, alongside his frequent collaborators Big YAYA, Big Gltaow, Big Baby, Four50, and MellyMigo, managed to produce a sound that was familiar enough to ring true for those who have grown to love New York’s new de-facto style but also pushed the boundaries of it enough to create something even more potent than before, and of course that was before they even ever began to sample mainstream and cult-classics left-and-right. Most recently Shawny Binladen headed to L.A. to link with acclaimed director DotComNirvan for a quite visually captivating new release titled “Hercules/Paradise,”  pitting Shawny alongside a violin-player to match the regal string portion found in the instrumental. The beat was created by the duo of Michigan’s Carlo and Massachusetts’ ZT who both have been steadily stockpiling underground and mainstream artsits alike over …

Calvin – [Big YAYA]

In the past year Shawny Binladen, Big YAYA, and the entire Woodhull Ave. crew and supporting cast of artists have all become quickly recognized names within New York City’s prestigious rap scene and have in many ways, largely thanks to the help of Cash Cobain, have in a sense reinvented what “drill” music has become known as up there. The sliding 808’s and dramatic strings and synths that NYC borrowed from the UK’s scene tended to fall flat, at least for me, and left me wishing that there was more depth, both sonically and lyrically, to New York’s rap scene and right about that time I stumbled upon Big YAYA. His wild, clearly very NYC but still unique lingo is what first caught me in addition to the fact that he is simply funny as fuck in his narration of the strung out underworld of addicts he constantly interacts with. Big YAYA recently released what, in my opinion, is his best and certainly most coherent project yet, CALVIN,  which shows an artistic maturation for the ruthless but always likable character. He and Shawny Binladen were two of the very first artists that I saw personally also get very into the wave …

BARACK – [Big YAYA] x [Big Baby]

We recently ran an article talking about the recent “sample drill” phenomenon going on in New York right now that has seen quite a few mainstream hits and underground classics get warped into drill form and skated over by many of the city’s hardest young artists, today one of the undisputed innovators of this new wave Big YAYA is joined by Big Baby for a new Useless Films directed visual “BARACK,” on which perhaps the initial architect of sample-drill, Sparkheem, who alongside artists like Goonew and Xanman, as well as producers like Spizzledoe, Mannyvelli, and Johnny Carvaggio, first began reworking old-school classics with futuristic trap drums, which albeit in Sparkheem’s case was at a more distinctively DMV-rhythym. Sparkheem blew my fucking mind with this one, as he flipped Drake, Rick Ross, and French Montana’s iconic 2012 “Stay Schemin’” at a faster pace with the off-kilter percussion that makes drill-music, in the NYC/UK sense, so instantly recognizable. It’s funny to me that YAYA hopped on such a legendary track that was in many ways dominated by Drake because I was just thinking that it is only a matter of time until The 6 God decides to steal YAYA’s (or really the …

A Beginner’s Guide To NYC Sample Drill

Sampling isn’t a new thing, and it surely isn’t new to hip-hop. In the 90s, during what some would consider the “golden age” of hip-hop, producers were flipping the soul records they grew up with into cutting edge rap records. But as time went on and hip-hop grew, the laws surrounding the use of other artists’ music for sampling grew increasingly restrictive, and the connections and money needed to successfully clear samples partially closed that window for smaller, independent artists. As a result, some producers even made it a point to make sample-free music, reflective of the general attitude toward the arduous process and legal implications of sample-clearing. There’s a new sound taking over New York right now, though, unconcerned with any of this. A wave of sample-based production is happening all over the city, pairing classic songs of all genres with NYC’s omnipresent drill sound – a lethal combination of hard-nosed drum patterns and soaring 808s with colorful arrays of samples, from rock songs to soul songs and everything in between. Artists are ignoring the “red tape” of sample clearance and releasing new music at breakneck speed, encouraging others to do the same. As a result, an entire world of sound …

Ease The Pain – [YaYa]

It’s been a cold winter for many of us, especially in Toronto where everything is locked up and COVID restrictions only seem to be tightening up further to kick off 2021. Last year, we were introduced to Canadian artist YaYa who really only turned to music once this pandemic made him move home from playing College Basketball in Houston. With his initial love being temporarily taken away from him, YaYa took matters into his own hands with his impressive debut “Change” that we covered last year. This dark R&B cut was only an introduction to what YaYa is capable of, to cap off one of the wildest years in history he blessed us with his second single titled “Ease The Pain” which shows a more lyrical use of his silky smooth vocals. While his catalog may not be deep, there’s no denying the raw talent he possesses. YaYa’s voice is truly remarkable, each track he drops he is proving he is ready to become a household name in his city and beyond. With production coming from Miler and the track being engineered by Losh, this song sounds incredibly crisp as his vocals cut through a simple string pattern that’s paired …

Clear The Perimeter – [Big YAYA]

Hollis, Queens rapper Big YAYA is back with another new visual today for his futuristic drill track “Clear The Perimeter” that definitely borrows a good deal of percussive elements from the new de-facto sound of the Big Apple, but is discombobulated and distorted in such a way that somehow manages to make the drill sound even more chaotic. YAYA and his Woodhull Avenue counterparts however are far from your average drill artists and even on drill-beats rap circles around their competitors who are still spitting nursery-rhyme bars. Instead of this weak and uninspired sound, YAYA is able to make his own sound that is certainly rooted in New York but is made unique between his tongue twisting flow and own ‘Grinchinese’ lingo that has been used by YAYA, Shawny Binladen, Dee Aura, and a couple of other artists I am sure that is beginning to be co-opted and used by many other artists, NYC and beyond. From ‘Mata’ to ‘Figi’ and even the way in which artists are starting to come at beats their influence is obvious and it is clear, at least to me, that they are the hardest artists currently in the New York streets. I am really …

Change – [YaYa]

Toronto is a neverending source for exciting new talent, it seems there is always a new voice emerging that speaks to the city’s diverse pool of outstanding artists. We have covered some impressive debuts from the city, but today we have one of our strongest yet from newcomer YaYa. The Texas-born, Toronto raised artist has an incredibly mesmerizing voice that stands out as soon as the intro gets going on his impressive first single “Change”. His vocals come together incredibly smoothly being that this is his first official release, showing that he is not wasting any time looking to stake his claim in the crowded Toronto landscape sooner than later. Canada’s Cultural Capital has some of the most intense competition with how much talent exists, its artists like YaYa that can cut through the commotion letting his talent do the talking. While his vocals immediately scream R&B superstar, he shows glimpses of being able to rap when needed making him a lethal threat if we’re talking talent. Jake Lowe directed the visuals that accompany the song begin by giving us a look into what YaYa’s life has looked like before moving to a more extravagant side to his lifestyle. He …

Roof Shooter – [Big YAYA]

Big YAYA and Surf Gang are back together yet again with YAYA’s latest track “Roof Shooter” produced by Evil Giane and Goner and I am very excited to see that YAYA is sticking with his fellow New Yorkers, after dropping one of his best song’s ever thanks to Giane’s production a couple of weeks ago titled “Don’t Think,” making for what is simply the one of the greatest underground link-ups this year, as YAYA and his Woodhull Ave fellows continue to put their Hollis section of Queens on the map. YAYA’s song structure often seems to follow the same pattern, leading in chanting the same phrases or mantras over and over to entice his listeners in before skating into his verses which are always highly animated and filled with his own unique slang that is beginning to be adopted by other artists far from Queens. Evil Giane and Goner’s beat is subdued and slower than some of their spellbinding creations in the past but they provided YAYA the perfect backdrop for talking his shit which he does in a way that is simultaneously boastful, playful, and cold-blooded. There are very few rappers who sound anything like Big YAYA and everything …