SEARCH FOR: STEVE ARRINGTON

It is What it is – [Thundercat]

The day that I have personally been waiting for, for what seems like ages, has finally come. Of course, the event I’m talking about is the highly anticipated release of Thundercat’s fourth studio album entitled It is What it is. I’ve been paying extremely close attention to all the moves he’s been making leading up to this release and I’ve even written up most of the singles he dropped prior to the entire project, so I was waiting with bated breath for some time now. Considering I’ve always been a massive fan of his hyper-charged bass skills mixed with his ability to incorporate all different genres of music into one fully encompassed genre of his own, I was expecting nothing short of amazing from this album. I believe he totally delivered on this record for multiple reasons. He had fun with certain themes on fun-loving songs while diving deeper into more personal issues he has dealt with on others, always demonstrating his immense talent on the bass guitar. His emotions are in full effect, sometimes being portrayed in a lighthearted manner as if he’s laughing at how crazy he can get about someone he loves, while other times truly putting …

Black Qualls- [Thundercat] ft. [Steve Lacy] & [Steve Arrington]

Thundercat is a one-off talent and pretty much the only artist in today’s music industry single-handedly keeping the funk genre alive and well. He does this of course with his own spin on the genre, but also bridges multiple generations and other genres together to create straight-up masterpieces. With the announcement of It is What it is, the follow up to his 2017 album Drunk, releasing on April 3rd, he decided to bless fans with a new single off of the upcoming project. “Black Qualls” sounds like it time-traveled straight out of the 70’s or 80’s with its overtly funk and even psychedelic vibe. The dense bass strums bring a specific groove to the single as other synths and harmonies bring the track to a whole new dimension. It starts out relatively quickly before slowing down, seemingly bridging the different paces together as the song picks up once again. Both Steve Lacy and Steve Arrington have opposing pitches, one being more tenor and the other more of a bass, but they accent each other through their differences immaculately. It’s also incredible to see new school and classic funk come together in one place, and even though the various styles are …