SEARCH FOR: RYLO RODRIGUEZ

Hood Depression – [Deepend Rucci]

It’s been a while since I have gone on SoundCloud without the intention of finding any new music and walked away with a new favorite project that I was not expecting and while its true that rare hidden gems are more few and far between today than in years past it cannot be emphasized enough that there are still hundreds upon hundreds of talented artists just waiting to be discovered and luckily enough today I stumbled upon Atlanta rapper Deepend Rucci whose latest EP Hood Depression is absolutely fantastic and to the surprise of no one, it seems like Atlanta might have a new young contender coming out of the streets. Rucci’s music and sound are quite unique for an artist so relatively unknown and, at least according to his SoundCloud, relatively new to making music in general. His tone is melodic and somber and clearly draws influence from artists like NoCap and Rylo Rodriguez whose unique deliveries and writing styles have made them a favorite to many southerners, but Rucci nonetheless puts his own distinctly Atlanta spin on this sound, building off of the progress made by those who came before him while still making sure he stands out. The opening …

No Slime Left Behind – [Slimelife Shawty]

The past twelve months have seen a number of Atlanta artists make their debuts and initial noteworthy statements, with a litany of debut projects, visuals, and singles that have been rousing in a number of ways and have shown a tremendous deal of promise for the collective state of their hip-hop scene. However, many of these artists who make an initial break fail to fully capitalize on the moment they were given and more or less squander their opportunities to shine and as the main criticism of trap music is invariably its lack of longevity it is always encouraging to see an artist develop their own unique sound and style, sometimes years after they are first introduced to the rap world. This was the case of Slimelife Shawty, who unfairly has been cast to the shadow of the YSL crew, initially being merely a “for fans of” artist associated with a number of the city’s bigger and more established street acts. He kept his nose to the grindstone and consistently fed the streets with new music, keeping himself quite relevant in the grand scheme of things despite clearly still being in the ‘dues-paying’ phase of a rap career. Singles accompanied …

Aite Come On – [WalknTalknCheck]

Currently, I am writing this article instead of a number of other write-ups from the past week that has surfaced, but none have me quite as excited as the debut of Nashville rapper WalknTalknCheck that has made a very bold statement with his first project release, Aite Come On, shining both lyrically and melodically, showing off his excellent vocals and numerous flows. Track two, “Dead Broke” was a particularly intoxicating record, produced by fellow Nashvillian IVBeats who has been on quite the run himself recently. WalknTalknCheck’s vocals on this track are impassioned and reminiscent of other southern titans like NoCap or Rylo Rodriguez, and while these are lofty comparisons I do not make them lightly. “Cramp My Hands” is a more sanguine cut off the record that features him utilizing his playful flow over the uplifting instrumental. Aite Come On comes to a close with the track “Break the Rules” where he gives quite possibly his best performance from the entire project, blending both melodies and grimy lyrics on top of his already emotionally potent vocals. Don’t sleep, WalknTalknCheck is sincerely the next big thing out of Nashville.

My Turn Deluxe – [Lil Baby]

There are several different ways to describe someone on a hot streak. Comparable to a LeBron James triple double, or a thirty kill-streak on Call of Duty, Lil Baby is undeniably one of, if not the hottest rapper in the game right now. The Atlanta, Georgia native and Quality Control member turned heads when he released his second studio album My Turn in February, with guest appearances from Lil Wayne, Lil Uzi Vert, 42 Dugg, Young Thug, Gunna, Rylo Rodriguez, and Moneybagg Yo. The chemistry shared between Lil Baby and his chosen features is magnificent like a Lamar Jackson juke. Lil Uzi Vert arguably delivered the most memorable guest verse of the year on “Commercial,” with Lil Baby somehow not being overshadowed on his own part. From “Drip Too Hard,” “Sold Out Dates,” Life Goes On,” and more, it is no secret that Lil Baby and Gunna are a formidable brotherly duo, linking up once more on “Heatin Up.” According to Billboard, in its first week alone, My Turn debuted at number one on the US Billboard 200 charts, with a staggering 197,000 album-equivalent units (including just under 10,000 legitimate album sales). Lil Baby is a fascinating artist because he completely understands what he’s best …

Easy To Love – [Rylo Rodriguez]

It may be my first time hearing him (and his first time gracing the pages of Lyrical Lemonade), but Rylo Rodiguez has been putting in work. “Easy To Love, his third single of the year (equipped with his second video) has garnered over 150,000 views in just two days, and it’s not hard to hear why; it’s most definitely rotation ready. I always find it weird when people are concerned with the length of a song. If it works who cares if it’s two minutes or ten minutes? “Easy To Love” is the perfect example. I didn’t even realize it has a sub-two minute run time, partly because I replayed like seven times, and partly because it’s a complete track the way it is. Rodriguez has a real understated style and his introspective (yet still braggadocious) wordplay combined with the (always) stellar strings from Seph Got The Waves, gives the song a “full” atmosphere that has the perfect accentuations of R&B sprinkled into his rap framework.

TLE Cinco talks his new album “Self-Conscious,” unique sound, and the current climate of Alabama rap

Thanks much in part to rap’s new national prominence many new regional destinations have emerged as notable hip-hop strongholds and, to me, one of the most intriguing areas that have surfaced is Birmingham, and there is one artist, in particular, that seems to encapsulate the 205 more than his large group of rap counterparts. TLE Cinco hails from Bessemer, AL, which is a city to Birmingham’s southwest that has been known to the world as a football factory rather than a major outpost for rap talent, but that seems subject-to-change as Truck Load Entertainment begins to unite Bessemer under their banner. The regional nature of rap has always been one of my favorite aspects to the genre and one of the great things that an art form as open and devoid of limitations like hip-hop is the consequential localization of trends, words, styles, and even sounds have become inextricably linked to different regions and neighborhoods because of different sonic metonymies brought about by that particular area’s local artists who help craft an identity for the place they’re from and broadcast it to the world through their music. For years music has been an outlet for expression that has allowed artists …