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The Ultimate Drake Album: A Twisted Love Story

FOREWORD In the history of the hip-hop industry, there has never been a more dominant artist than Aubrey “Drake” Graham. The 33 year-old superstar has undergone several re-inventions over the years, much to the delight of his ever-growing fanbase. As much as we have seen him progress, however, the substance in his music carries one glaring constant – heartbreak. It’s no secret that Drake is the master of the introspective love song, and as much as it probably pains him to have to go through experiences that inspire these records, the music has continued to serve as salvation for distraught fans everywhere.  At this point, we owe Drake for giving us all this incredible music at the expense of his own emotional distress. My first thought in paying homage was to curate a carefully-selected 100-song playlist of all his best music. Quickly, I realized that: 1) it’s an impossibly subjective task to narrow down his 100 “best” records, and 2) a playlist that deep is sure to oversaturate the respect we’re trying to pay in this instance. So I took a different approach. I thought to myself, ‘what would Drake appreciate the most from the perspective of a long-time fan? …

Midnight Butter – [Juicebox] x [Hazy Year]

It’s always a great feeling when you stumble upon a gem while searching for new music to listen to. That’s exactly what happened when I peeped Juicebox and Hazy Year’s collaborative Midnight Butter album, which is arguably my favorite project of 2020 so far! Self-proclaimed “Ellen DeGenreless,” Juicebox is a born and raised New York native currently residing in Los Angeles. Beyond being an extremely dope emcee, Juicebox also has a passion for photography, film, and skateboarding. Juicebox’s style is super mellow, frequently meshing well with silky boom-bap, smooth jazz, and chilled lo-fi beats. I immediately likened Juice’s sound to the legendary rap duo A Tribe Called Quest’s; specifically Q-Tip’s as both emcees float over the instrumentals they touch. Don’t be fooled by Juicebox’s nonchalant approach; like Q-Tip, Juice is a highly skilled lyricist capable of igniting the tempo with aggression at any point in time. For example, on the flute-filled record “Soprano,” Juicebox cleverly remarks: “It’s simple, the only thing you’re pimpin’ is a pimple, while a thug would put a hole in your face not talkin’ dimple.” As for the producer, Hazy Year is an established producer out of Norway, incorporating primarily a mixture of lo-fi hip-hop with occasionally …

Rain – [Lil Yachty]

Seeing the transformation that Lil Yachty has made ever since coming onto the scene has been nothing short of incredible. He went from being one of the more controversial rappers, not because of his lyrical content but because of his somewhat simple and elementary sound, to one of the biggest artists on the planet. The entire way, he has figured out ways to capitalize on money-making opportunities from collaborations with brands like Target and Sprite because of his appeal to younger crowds but also proved that he’s not someone to mess with through hard-hitting verses and fantastic guest spots. Although he might be one of the more uncharacteristic talents in Atlanta, he draws influences in certain parts of his music that are telltale of the southern city. His style is dynamic, and his range of sounds allows him to fit in on almost any song, whether it’s a happy-go-lucky track or an aggressive banger. Considering I still believe that his Lil Boat series are some of his best complete offerings to date, his latest single “Rain” brings me back to some simpler times when he was still making a name for himself in the industry prior to being the superstar …

Lynch Mob- [Father] ft. [SEANTHOMMONEY]

I feel like when it comes to all my recent articles, I keep writing about Atlanta artists. It’s weird, however, that none of the songs and videos I’ve been writing about are even remotely similar or should even be considered from the same planet despite being from the same city. There’s been what some people consider mumble rap, trap, bubblegum Rap, and more, but Father doesn’t fit into any of these categories. In fact, he doesn’t really fit into any subsets of Hip-Hop that have a label, but rather has a lane of his own that no one can come close to impeding on. Although he might not be considered at the top of the list for some people when it comes to the most popular artists coming out of Atlanta, his clever wordplay, comedic elements, and unique flows keep me coming back for more. Fresh off of two random singles he dropped earlier this month, Father is back with another intriguing loosie called “Lynch Mob” featuring SEANTHOMMONEY. To set a more serious tone, harp strums create a mystifying melody along with some fascinating percussion. Father has multiple layers of vocals full of autotune on the hook, making it sound …

Staff Picks: Our Personal Favorite Projects of the 2010s

Nearing the end of any year — nevermind a decade — blogs get crowded with lists about the objective “best” projects of the year. Even Lyrical Lemonade has one. But looking toward the end of the 2010s, we decided that we’d try something a bit different. For just about all of our writers, the 2010s capture the period of growing up, per se. As such, the music to come from the past decade is what has shaped us into the people that we are. Taking this into consideration, we asked 5 writers to each list 3 albums from the 2010s that had the most personal impact on them. Not the “best” albums, or even necessarily the hits. Just 3 albums that spoke to them on a personal level. Below is the result. Enjoy, and feel free to share with us your own 3 picks on social media! – – – Brodie Harvey If You’re Reading This It’s Too Late – Drake (2015) Of all artists on this list, it would be hard to argue that anybody had a better 10 years than Drake. This project, in particular, was wildly impactful on the decade as a whole. It came at a time …

Lights Turn Low – [Planet Girl]

The word “earworm” is certainly overused (guilty as charged), but in all honesty, I can’t find another adjective to describe the mesmeric abilities of “Lights Turn Low” by Planet Girl. Sure, the song is a ukelele-driven product of bedroom pop, but there’s something more to the picture here. Maybe it’s the silky smooth background vocals done by Planet Girl, herself, or maybe it’s the unrivaled use of melody here, but “Lights Turn Low” is unforgettable. And yes, I totally understand that my obsession with random SoundCloud cuts isn’t always rational. But this one? I don’t know. Planet Girl is onto something, and by all means, I can’t get this song out of my head. There’s purity in the lyrics’ profound sense of affection, and Planet Girl’s voice is equally compelling as it is lovable. She’s a fantastic singer, and one with great conviction, perfectly fit to tell an unforgettable story in just over 2 and a half minutes. “Lights Turn Low” is the product of all of this and more, so listen below!

Our 50 Favorite Kid Cudi Songs

Bravery in vulnerability. Honesty in the face of pain. Effortless trend-setting. Undying authenticity. Inimitable talent. Astonishing hooks, soaring highs, and heartfelt lows. Creative ambition. The list goes on. These attributes and so many more are what makes Kid Cudi a living legend. From his stature as one of the most sonically and aesthetically influential artists alive to an entire catalog of classic albums, mixtapes, features, and chart-topping singles, there’s no denying the sheer impact and importance of the Cleveland-bred artist. His contributions not only to music, but to mental health awareness, fashion, and even acting range over a broad palette of interests and ventures, all of which bring fans back to the one and only Scott Mescudi — a multi-talented star in every right and the kind of artist and human that only comes around once in a lifetime. For our team at Lyrical Lemonade and for countless others, Kid Cudi has soundtracked some of our best moments in life just as much as he’s saved and helped us in our worst. With this in mind, to say that Kid Cudi is an artist for all occasions is an understatement, and furthermore, to say that he’s touched countless lives is …

Denzel Curry: Retracing Roots

“I think about how my art is going to be reflected when I’m gone.” This is something Denzel Curry said to me during our conversation just moments before his stellar performance for 5,000 people in Boston this past Friday in support of Billie Eilish’s When We All Fall Asleep tour. Denzel has been an artist that I’ve held in high regard over the years because I’ve been able to recognize his dedication to the art, and to hear him talk about his passion for the craft was inspiring. Denzel Curry has been rapping for about eight years now, and by the young age of twenty-four, he’s already passed huge milestones in the game of rap due to his impressive work ethic and unwavering artistic integrity. Not only does he have an incredible discography under his belt, but he’s already garnered a noticeable impact on the genre of rap at such a young age, all while constantly growing, evolving, and refining his output in the process. On a widespread scale, many fans became aware of Curry after his track “Ultimate” turned into a viral internet sensation, becoming the “water-bottle-flipping” song just a few years back. Even this track though, as big …

I Feel It Coming – [The Weeknd]

Coming off the massive success of his third studio album “Starboy,” XO frontman The Weeknd has dropped yet another video, and this time it’s for his Daft Punk collab titled “I Feel It Coming.” At a first glance, the Weeknd/ Daft Punk connection seemed unusual until you press play and lose yourself in the wavy, electronic-type beat produced by the legendary duo known as Daft Punk. On top of that, the Warren Fu-directed cut takes an 80’s-inspired journey through space which see’s The Weeknd chilling on a planet with a pretty girl and much more. I won’t spoil it for you though, make sure to feast your eyes on the “I Feel It Coming” visual below and look out for more videos from The Weeknd in the near future. Directed by: Warren Fu Produced by: Raffi Adlan